How fog computing is enabling augmented reality…#womenintech

russ deveau twitter fog for ar via network world

A nice read by Network World’s Jon Gold on how fog computing can advance augmented reality initiatives.

The article gives an interesting perspective on some of challenges that need to be addressed as augmented reality moves more and more into the mainstream.

It’s one of the first stories I’ve seen highlighting some of the security issues associated with the fast-moving augmented reality space.

The story features the work of Dr. Maria Gorlatova, a professor at Duke University.

I had the opportunity to hear Gorlatova speak when she was in New York City at a tech event in the spring of 2017, and then again in Santa Clara at Fog World Congress 2017.

Her innovative work in edge and fog computing is laying the groundwork for advancing a wide range of Industry 4.0 initiatives.

Read the full article here. – Russ DeVeau

A crypto coin bloodbath ahead?

russ deveau twitter #nyctech

I’ve been following crypto coin and token initiatives for quite some time, mainly because a few of the players in the space have done a good job positioning in the edge and fog computing markets, two areas I have covered and promoted for the past two years.

I am not an investor in any cryptocurrency and it’s highly unlikely I will ever invest in the crowded, continuously evolving and increasingly turbulent coin industry.

There are hundreds and hundreds of coins in the market today. Many have struggled to gain traction after an initial coin offering (ICO), several have proven to be scams and many have failed.

It’s an interesting space, for sure. Many of the developer, research and scientific teams working on coin initiatives have exciting stories to tell. Interesting white papers and use cases published by coin marketing and research teams abound.

But I haven’t seen any significant differentiators from some of the most visible players in the altcoin space. Beyond a handful of vertical specific applications and some well publicized use cases, leadership appears – at least at this stage of the game – to be up for grabs.

There’s a lot of marketing hype associated with the coin industry. This is driven in part by the many large – and often extremely aggressive – communities that work hard to up the visibility of the coins they represent across almost every social media platform.

I regularly attend and cover a wide range of #nyctech events. I’ve gone to four New York City Meetups focused on three different coin initiatives this year.

Content for every one of those meetings focused largely on use cases and marketing collateral. But curiously enough, no presenter ever discussed how the coins they represent relate to the use cases reviewed at these sessions.

Last night I went to the Economics of Data, Decentralization and Distributed Ledgers Meetup in Manhattan. The panel was sponsored by IOTA New York City and featured IOTA’s Kevin Chen, Wikimedia’s Kaitlin Thaney, tech writer and VC McKenna Walsh and Ed Maguire from Momenta Partners.

Chen highlighted autonomous vehicles and smart city applications as potential use cases for the IOTA platform.

These two Industry 4.0 initiatives are currently experiencing phenomenal growth in markets around the world. So it was not a surprise to hear IOTA discuss these use cases last night.

It was a bit of a surprise however, to hear McKenna Walsh’s view on the coin market.

When asked by an audience member what she thought of the state of the coin industry, Walsh responded by saying that she believes a bloodbath is coming and that almost every coin will fail.

Walsh went on to say that coins making it through the turmoil that will likely occur in 2019, should consider reorganizing to focus on specializing in one use case, and then grow from there.

In a crypto market seemingly under constant pressure to perform, this could be very smart advice for coin enthusiasts, investors and marketers. – Russ DeVeau

I took the pictures above at last night’s event. Top image, from left to right – Kevin Chen, Ed Maguire and Kaitlin Thaney. Bottom left image – Ed Maguire and Kaitlin Thaney. Bottom right image – Kaitlin Thaney and McKenna Walsh.

Related:

-IoT in New York City – an open standards point of view

Mingling with the Knightscope #robots in #NYC!

 

Mingling with the Knightscope #robots in #NYC!

russ deveau twitter rpa new york city

Next generation security monitoring on display at @iKnightscope in New York City.

These R2-D2 lookalikes move around interior and exterior spaces to help keep people and places safe. They are in use in several cities around world.

I had the opportunity to meet these little guys during yesterday’s first ever New York Robotic Process Automation (RPA) and AI tech Meetup.

The meeting was held at the Knightscope showroom at 501 Lexington Avenue in Manhattan where I had a discussion with a Knightscope representative about cloud, edge and fog computing. These robots leverage Amazon’s cloud.

The Knightscope showroom is a haven for selfie takers and for anyone interested in seeing how robots are being used in the security space today. I saw many people stop in front of the showroom to watch in amazement as these smart robots moved around and interacted with people inside and outside the store.

Knightscope has many opportunities to position in the robotics and security spaces. The company has an incredibly fun and extremely timely industry 4.0 story to tell. – Russ DeVeau

Artificial intelligence and machine learning for content creators…not yet, but it’s coming

russ deveau twitter ai machine learning new york city

I’ve been following how artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning may impact marketing and content development for the past year or so, mainly because I am always on the hunt for new ways to improve my own content and content development processes.

Last night I had the opportunity to learn a bit more about these technologies from some of the tech and creative experts who are developing and using artificial intelligence and machine learning tools today.

The team at Ustwo hosted a Designing with AI panel at their offices – a great space on lower Broadway – focused on AI, machine learning and computational creativity. The panel featured input from Google’s Mathew Ray, Adobe’s Patrick Hebron and New York University’s Allison Parish. Ustwo’s Dave Fisher served as panel moderator.

This group of experts discussed some of the AI and machine learning tools developers, technology and creative teams are currently using to create a range of interesting content.

While the technologies the group discussed were interesting to hear about, the demos included in the presentation appeared to be works in progress. They were cool to see, but the tools used to create those demos could not be used to satisfy my – albeit, relatively selfish – goal of leaving the session with pointers to tools I could incorporate into my content development strategies today.

Some of the tools discussed last night seemed to be in their infancy and have been developed based largely on community input and the collaborative collection of data. And data of course, matters. Machine learning requires the appropriate data to constantly improve processes and output.

Hebron did not discuss any Adobe tools during last night’s event. But it does appear that Adobe is hoping to lead in the development of AI and machine learning tools for the marketing industry. This isn’t surprising given how popular Photoshop is among content creators worldwide.

Adobe has posted a few interesting articles about AI and machine learning on their website and highlights extreme time saving as one important benefit for content creators.

While the widespread use of AI and machine learning for content creators may be a few years off, tools and apps for incorporating a degree of augmented (AR) and virtual reality (VR) into strategic content are becoming available on a somewhat regular basis.

It’s looking like Apple, Snapchat, Magic Leap and Unity are among the early leaders in key AR and VR initiatives, and that the advertising industry will drive some phenomenal growth in these markets during the next two or three years.

I’ve been tweeting about augmented and virtual reality for the past several months in order to showcase how some of these initiatives are helping to transform the advertising and marketing industries. I’ll continue to post on these evolving technologies – with a slant toward market research and to showcase new tools for content creators – on a somewhat regular basis.

In the meantime, I’m always interested in networking with other market research and content development pros who may be experimenting with, using, or researching next generation technologies from the content creator point point of view. Get in touch with me on LinkedIn or Twitter if you’d like to connect.

The picture above is from last night’s event, which was the third Designing with AI session Ustwo has sponsored this year. From left to right, Googles’s Mathew Ray, Adobe’s Patrick Hebron, New York University’s Allison Parrish and Ustwo’s Dave Fisher.

The image below is from a video I posted on Twitter of a new Pepsi Max ad. The video provides a great example of how augmented and virtual reality are changing advertising and demonstrates how powerful these technologies can be when it comes to promoting brand awareness. – Russ DeVeau

russ deveau twitter pepsi max mixed reality ad.png