Winning an Environmental Leader Award

Russ DeVeau Environmental Leader Award russell deveauSpeaking of prestigious industry awards…

I’ve been an avid reader and a big fan of Environmental Leader for many years. The outlet is one of my go-to publications when I am working with technology teams and executives who can tell stories in the energy efficiency, green IT and sustainability sectors.

I also look at a wide variety of Environmental Leader content when I want to create or help validate an idea for an industry trend story and when I am researching a potential new sustainable ICT positioning opportunity for one of my clients.

I’ve worked proactively with many top-notch journalists at the outlet over the past several years including when I helped place this story based on ODCA news announcing how enterprises can measure and control data center CO2 emissions.

The story was incredibly well received by communities and target audiences around the world. Equally as important, the coverage set the stage for involving ODCA in the Environmental Leader Product & Project Awards program.

The Environmental Leader Product & Project Awards reminds me of the IDDYs, a global awards program I launched when I was working in the digital identity management, security and privacy sectors.

One major difference in the programs is the fee required to apply for an award. Environmental Leader charges a fee to submit a nomination. No fees were associated with the IDDYs.

The fee was a bit of a sticking point when it came to my client teams deciding on whether or not to apply for the Environmental Leader award.

After managing the IDDYs for four years, I understand why award programs sometimes charge an application fee. I know first-hand how much time and how many resources can go into making a global annual awards program successful.

I also know that the ROI can be significant from a communications and public relations point of view when an organization wins an award that is sponsored by a highly respected media outlet.

These are some of the reasons I was in favor of paying the application fee for an Environmental Leader award.

But I was also in favor of paying the fee because I wrote the press release and messaging that led to a feature story in the top-tier outlet.

I knew the content was of the highest quality and – based on my experience working in the global awards industry – also knew that an ODCA submission would have a very good chance of winning.

The eventual win opened the door to another round of significant coverage in Environmental Leader and provided the organizations involved with a variety of new short and long-term positioning opportunities.

When it comes to demonstrating communications and public relations ROI, the Environmental Leader award was an all-around win. – Russ DeVeau

Russ DeVeau on curation attribution

A few yeaRuss DeVeau Sustainable ICT Dailyrs back web aggregation seemed to be all the rage. Technologies such as Yahoo Pipes and custom developed applications such as the one I spearheaded for Kantara Initiative became popular for aggregating news and content on portals and websites.

Fast forward to today and web curation has become an incredibly popular medium for aggregating, publishing and branding content on the web. But as curation continues to grow in popularity, issues related to attribution are increasingly becoming a hot topic.

Authors of original works and organizations publishing unique content have understandably raised concerns about having the names of others associated with their work on curated pages. Some industry analysts have joined the attribution discussion by calling on the communications industry to take the lead in ensuring proper attribution of curated works.

While there are ongoing conversations about standardizing attribution for the curated world, a single method has yet to be consistently adopted.

I’m seeing the h/t (hat-tip, a reference that originated on Twitter) and via as two of the most common forms of curation attribution. My current favorite is using the word SOURCE to clearly call out authors and outlets on curated posts. This is the method I currently use for the Russ DeVeau Sustainable ICT Daily – one of several topics I curate – and the method I see as fair to authors of original works.

While formal attribution isn’t part of everyone’s curation strategy, I believe giving a personal shout-out to the authors and outlets that produce the stories I select for my curated sites is an important tactic as the curation industry continues to evolve.

What about you? Do you have thoughts on web curation attribution? Give a shout on Twitter @Russ_DeVeau or on LinkedIn as I continue to look at best practices for web curation. – Russ DeVeau

NYC energy efficiency

I’m always glad to see new activities taking place in lower Manhattan. And given that I focus heavily on sustainable ICT, I’m equally pleased to see that the new World Trade Center will become a model for urban energy efficiency.

EarthTechling has reprinted an article by Ali Levine that details how the new World Trade Center buildings are expected to be at least 20% more energy efficient than New York City’s current energy code requirement.

Check out all the energy saving features by reading Levine’s article here and see more renderings of the new World Trade Center complex at WTC.org.

Image via WTC.org. – Russ DeVeau

Intel: What happens in an Internet minute?

Intel has released a very cool piece highlighting what happens on the Internet every minute. Did you know that in just one minute…

…more than 204 million emails are sent

…approximately 20 million photos are viewed on Flickr

…at least 6 million Facebook pages are viewed around the world

…more than 61,000 hours of music are played on Pandora

…more than 1.3 million video clips are watched on YouTube

Given my focus areas, I’d also be interested in looking at the energy consumed in an Internet minute and at the security and privacy risks involved in the continuously growing social networking world.

Check out the Intel Inside Scoop blog for more highlights. – Russ DeVeau

Russ DeVeau and Earth Hour

Earth Hour takes place this Saturday, March 31 from 8:30 to 9:30pm in local time zones. Participation in the global event has grown by millions since Earth Hour was first held in Australia back in 2007.

With a focus on positioning energy efficient technologies in global markets, I’m proud to join the celebration again this year and equally proud to help promote the “go beyond the hour to do more for the planet all year long” message that the World Wildlife Fund established in 2011.

One of the easiest ways to go beyond the hour to reduce energy consumption at home and at work is by turning your laptop and PC power management on. It’s a set-it-and-forget-it step that could save you up to $60 a year in energy costs for every computer using power management and is an easy way to do more for the planet all year long.

Check the Earth Hour website for great info about this year’s event. – Russ DeVeau

Let’s talk about energy efficiency, greener clouds and sustainable ICT!

Russ DeVeau sustainability

With ten years of experience supporting tech giants and leading Internet and technology initiatives, and another ten years of experience supporting global technology consortia, I’ve expanded my portfolio of services to include an even greater focus on energy efficient technologies.

This includes sustainable information and communications technologies (ICT), the technologies that may help drive the deployment of greener clouds and the development of communications strategies and tactics to help organizations position and differentiate in these areas. – Russ DeVeau

Russ DeVeau on social media contests

I’m supporting another social media contest – this time for CSCI, a global technology consortium with a membership base consisting of leaders in the sustainability industry.

While I’ve launched and managed many social media contests in the past, the growth of social networks has created a group of contest “professionals” who are aggressive in playing to win. New technologies, the formation of contest networks and the growth of online contest pros need to be key factors when launching any managing social media contests and sweepstakes.

Should a social media contest be on your content calendar? Take a look at my new best practices for social media contests post here. – Russ DeVeau

Climate Savers Computing Announces Earth Hour Power Management Twitter Contest

Theme: Turn power management on for a greener and more energy efficient planet

PORTLAND Ore., March 14, 2012 — Climate Savers Computing Initiative (CSCI), the international consortium focused on reducing the energy consumption and carbon footprint of information and communications technologies (ICT), today announced that its Earth Hour 2012 Retweet for Power Management Contest will run from March 23 through March 30. Winners will be announced on CSCI’s Twitter and Facebook pages on Tuesday, April 3.

CSCI started the contest in 2011 to raise awareness of the environmental and financial benefits of using power management on laptops, PCs and servers, and in response to Earth Hour’s call for people and organizations to do more for the planet all year long. People participated in the contest by following CSCI on Twitter, retweeting CSCI contest tweets, and taking the CSCI pledge to use power management at home and at work.

In 2012 there are even more ways to win. In addition to Twitter, people can enter by liking CSCI’s Facebook page and by sharing CSCI’s Facebook contest post with their Facebook friends. People who retweet, take the CSCI power management pledge, and like and share on Facebook will have 10 chances to win a prize donated by CSCI members.

“We invite everyone to join us in celebrating Earth Hour 2012 by turning their power management on and by participating in this year’s CSCI Retweet for Power Management Contest,” said George O. Goodman, executive director, CSCI.

Rules and prizes are available on CSCI’s Facebook page.

About Climate Savers Computing Initiative
CSCI is a 700 member consortium led by sustainability leaders from Cisco, Emerson Network Power, Google, Intel, Juniper Networks, Microsoft, Samsung and World Wildlife Fund. Since its launch in 2007 the organization has helped the ICT industry save over $2 billion in annual energy costs by decreasing annual CO2 emissions from computing equipment by 41 – 45 million metric tons. CSCI has done this by driving the adoption of power management and through the development of more energy efficient computing and networking technologies. Nearly 11,000 people have joined CSCI by pledging to use power management and to purchase energy efficient computing products. Follow CSCI on
 
the Web http://www.climatesaverscomputing.org/,
Facebook http://on.fb.me/MJhVU,
Twitter http://twitter.com/csci_tweets ,
LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/groups?gid=44067&mostPopular=&trk=tyah
 
                                                                                ###
 
Climate Savers® is a trademark or registered trademark of WWF, the international conservation organization. Used under license.
 
Contact:
Russell DeVeau
Russ DeVeau 
Russ DeVeau on Twitter @Russ_DeVeau
 
 
 

New book on energy efficient computing

A new book authored by energy efficiency experts from Intel shows how computers use energy, how to measure energy use, and specific hardware and software design methodologies that lead to energy savings. Check out “Energy Aware Computing: Powerful Approaches for Green System Design,” and meet the authors on the Intel Press website here. – Russ DeVeau

Named one of the top ten women in sustainability

News this week from CSCI, one of the organizations I work with! – Russ DeVeau

President of Climate Savers Computing to Speak at GLOBE 2012

Panel addresses energy efficiency and alternative power for business

PORTLAND Ore and VANCOUVER Canada, Feb. 21, 2012 — Climate Savers Computing Initiative (CSCI), the 700-member international consortium focused on reducing the energy consumption and carbon footprint of information and communications technologies (ICT), today announced that its president, Lorie Wigle, will participate in a panel discussion on March 15 at GLOBE 2012 in Vancouver, Canada.

Named one of the top ten women in sustainability by Pink Magazine in 2010 and recipient of the 2011 Sustainable Business Leadership Award from Sustainable Business Oregon, Lorie Wigle is General Manager of Eco-Technology at Intel Corporation where she drives Intel’s market position across energy efficient performance and use of technology to address environmental challenges.

As president of Climate Savers Computing, Wigle represents Intel on the CSCI Board of Directors and collaborates with other board members from Cisco, Emerson Network Power, Google, Juniper Networks, Microsoft, Samsung and World Wildlife Fund to drive the CSCI mission of advancing the use of power management on laptops, PCs and servers, and driving more energy efficient computing and networking technologies.

During her remarks at GLOBE 2012, Wigle will review steps Intel is taking to improve energy efficiency and will highlight how CSCI has already helped the ICT industry save over $2 billion in annual energy costs by decreasing annual CO2 emissions from computing equipment by 41 to 45 million metric tons.

“We’re thrilled to have CSCI leadership participating in GLOBE 2012 where leaders in sustainability are coming together to advance a cleaner and more energy efficient future,” said George O. Goodman, executive director, CSCI.

Information about GLOBE 2012 is available at http://2012.globeseries.com/

About Climate Savers Computing Initiative
CSCI is reducing the energy consumption of ICT by increasing the adoption of power management and driving the development and deployment of energy efficient computing and networking technologies. Since its launch in 2007 CSCI has grown to 700 members. Nearly 11,000 people have joined by pledging to use power management and to purchase energy efficient computing products. CSCI maintains a catalog of energy efficient products and a library of best practices and white papers for energy efficiency on its website. Follow CSCI on the Web http://www.climatesaverscomputing.org/, Facebook http://on.fb.me/MJhVU, Twitter http://twitter.com/csci_tweetsLinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/groups?gid=44067&mostPopular=&trk=tyah
 
Climate Savers® is a trademark or registered trademark of WWF, the international conservation organization. Used under license.
 
Contact:
Russ DeVeau
russ deveau @ comcast.net
Russ DeVeau on Twitter – http://twitter.com/#!/Russ_DeVeau
Mobile/Text- 908-251-1549

I’m participating in Earth Hour 2012

Earth Hour was started in 2007 and takes place once every year on the last Saturday in March. I’ve participated since 2008.

I’m looking forward to taking part in the event again on March 31 when hundreds of millions of people will be turning their lights off in a show of support for the planet.

World Wildlife Fund gives a great year by year overview of Earth Hour – complete with pictures and videos – here. – Russ DeVeau

Client Project: Are You Ignoring One Of The Simplest Ways To Go Green?

One of many articles I had a lot of fun ghostwriting for my pals at Climate Savers Computing Initiative. This story discusses how people and businesses are missing out on the benefits of PC power management. – Russ DeVeau

Are You Ignoring One Of The Simplest Ways To Go Green?

Earlier this month Ovum, the UK-based analyst firm published a report showing that many businesses and organizations are missing out on the benefits of using power management on PCs.

I was thrilled to see CSCI members – who are global leaders in driving the wide scale adoption of power management – included in the report and equally glad to see that the report highlights the huge financial and environmental savings organizations can realize by implementing power management systems.

If you’re reading this article, you may be wondering what is power management and what’s the big deal? This a great question and one I answer frequently when talking to people and organizations about CSCI’s mission and the benefits of membership. Power management controls the amount of energy your laptop or computer uses when it’s not in use. Power management controls are already loaded on your computer and with just a few clicks can be implemented in minutes. Depending on the cost of energy in your area and the age of your computer, implementing power management can save you up to $60 a year on your electricity bill. It’s an easy way to save money and an even easier way to do your part to help save the environment.

But the Ovum report looks at how enterprises are using power management and highlights how many organizations are ignoring the environmental and bottom-line benefits that wide scale deployment of power management can deliver. If using power management on just one computer at home can save up to $60 a year in energy costs, imagine what the savings could be if an enterprise has hundreds or thousands of computers running power management systems. The environmental and financial savings would indeed be huge. In fact, Ovum found that enterprises were overlooking energy consumption savings of up to 40% by not implementing power management across the organization.

So why would enterprises miss out on such huge environmental and financial savings? According to findings by Ovum at least some of the hesitation enterprises have about deploying large-scale power management is based on false perceptions, one of which is that power management systems may interfere with core IT processes. And while members of our power management workgroup have worked collaboratively to address this perception, it was great to see that none of the vendor products Ovum looked at for their January report caused any interference with IT operations or maintenance.

It is clear however, that barriers – both real and perceived – are hindering the wide scale deployment of enterprise power management systems. But I’m pleased to say that CSCI members are leading the charge in helping to ensure these barriers are eliminated. And I’m equally pleased to say that our Power Management workgroup moves quickly to address new issues as soon as we learn about them from members and from the global information and communications technologies (ICT) community.

During the last several months our power management workgroup has held productive roundtables throughout North America and in Europe with the number one goal of helping to ensure that software and power management can always work seamlessly together. These events have brought CSCI power management experts together with developers and enterprises to address a wide variety of power management issues and have been extremely successful in helping to move enterprise power management systems forward.

As we move full-speed-ahead into a new year, we’ve made increasing the adoption of power management on laptops, PCs and servers a top focus area for 2012. And with 700 corporate members from around the world and over 11,000 people joining as individuals by pledging to use power management at home and at work, we’re moving quickly to increase the well over $2 billion in annual energy costs we’ve helped the global ICT industry save through the use of power management and more energy efficient computing.

Hats off to Ovum for helping to educate businesses and organizations about the benefits power management can deliver. And here’s to an ever increasing number of people and businesses leveraging power management as an important tool for meeting a variety of energy saving and sustainability goals.